Friday, May 22, 2020

Why Do People Get Married What Do Marriages Stand For...

Why do people get married? What do marriages stand for? Marriage is a union between two people who wish to unite their life together. The reason that people today get married is for love. However, marriage means more than love. A reason why many people get married is that they have found companionship, love, and comfort in another person. The idea of a marriage has different meanings to people. Some marry for money, love or resources. In modern times, many philosophies have changed throughout the year. In her book marriage, Juliet H severance states that  ¨marriage institution claim that it offers the best possible opportunity for individual and collective happiness†¦Ã‚ ¨(severance 3) Marriage is a way to achieve happiness. Many ideas of marriage have changed. However, some ideas and still exist. Marriage is a form of motivation, regardless of their reasons. The reason people get married is mainly love, money, and traditions. The first major reason for the existence for marri age is love. Modern marriages take love as their prime factor. So many ask what love is? Love is caring deeply about another person, it seems impossible to be without them. The ideology allows people from different social classes, religions, genders and races to be united without any opposition to their relationship. Mostly people marry when they find a person who is a friend, protector, supporter and a lover. Love cannot be explained since it has many meanings, but in marriage, it allows people toShow MoreRelatedWhy Do People Get Married? What Does Marriage Stand For? Marriage?918 Words   |  4 PagesWhy do people get married? What does marriage stand for? Marriage is a union between two people who wish to unite their life together. The reason that people today get married is for love. However, marriage means more than love. A reason why many people get married is that they have found companionship, love, and comfort in another person. The idea of a marriage has different mean ings to people. Some marry for money, love or resources. In modern times, many philosophies procure change throughoutRead MoreWhy Do People Get Married? What Do Marriage?966 Words   |  4 PagesWhy do people get married? What do marriage stands for? Marriage is a union between two people who wish to unite their life together. The reason that people today get married is for love. However, marriage means more than love. A reason why many people get married is that have acquire the companionship, love, and comfort in another person. The idea of a marriage has different meanings to people. In the past centuries, a great number of people would marry for money and resources, rather than loveRead MoreGay Marriage Should Be Legal1169 Words   |  5 PagesGay marriage should be legalized. Our civil rights and the Constitution give us many liberties. One of our civil liberties is the pursuit of happiness, which homosexual people are not allowed to chase. They cannot be married to the perso n they love and it violates their freedoms. According to professorshouse.com, â€Å"In Alaska, Nevada, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Nebraska, Missouri, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Kansas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, and Alabama, notRead MorePersuasive Essay On Arranged Marriage1015 Words   |  5 Pages Marriage is a lifelong commitment. Teenagers should be allowed to make their own choices but should also make sure they think about their choices before making them. Teenagers change throughout their life. Teenagers may change their personality and even change who they are friends with. Parents do not always know who their child is friends with and who they talk to. Parents do not always know what is going on with their child’s life, if a parent does not know what is going on in their child’sRead MoreLgbt Marital Rights. Could You Imagine Not Being Able To1260 Words   |  6 Pagesrest of your life with? There are many benefits, rights, and protections available to married couples in the federal law. These benefits, rights, and protections include things like, tax benefits, government benefits, employment benefits, death benefits, family benefits, and more! In 2017, marriage is an internationally recognized right for all people, as of 2015. But it has not always b een that way. Gay people are already unable to adopt; should they really not have the right to marry either? OverRead MoreEssay on I Now Pronounce You Man and Wife1740 Words   |  7 Pagesend a life. What is marriage exactly? The dictionary defines marriage as any close or intimate association or union. There are more people afraid of this kind of commitment today than there were years ago. Then again, there are those who think marriage is something to do because you’re bored. It’s a joke to them. Being a stand believer of the ethics of marriage, its value is something to be cherished. A personal definition defines marriage as â€Å"a commitment, partnership, ‘till death do us part† (Sanchez)Read MoreShould Gay Marriage Be Legalized?1705 Words   |  7 PagesOption 1 Gay marriage has and still is a huge controversy in the United States. I will say though that the U.S. has come along way when it comes to same-sex marriage. As of November 20, 2014 gay marriage is now legal in thirty-five of the fifty U.S. states. Massachusetts was the first state to legalize same-sex marriage in May of two thousand and four. As of October ninth two-thousand and fourteen, only sixteen out of one hundred and ninety-four countries allow same sex marriage. By those oddsRead MoreThe Catholic Ideal of the Sacrament of Marriage Essay1128 Words   |  5 PagesThe Catholic Ideal of the Sacrament of Marriage In the Catholic view, marriage is that it is sacramental. This means that marriage is a covenant relationship between the man and woman involved and hence it is voluntary and boundless. Its clear purpose is the begetting of children and mutual companionship and help. Virginity however, is the preferred state in Catholic belief. The primary purpose of marriage is to fulfill a vocation in the nature of man and woman, forRead MoreHomosexuals Have Every Right to Marry686 Words   |  3 PagesHomosexuals have every right to marry. Marriage is a basic human right, if straights can marry in all states then so should gays. Gay rights of all kinds are starting to become increasingly protected. â€Å"In every courthouse, in every proceeding and in every place where a member of the department of justice, stands on behalf of the United States, they will strive to ensure that same-sex marriages receive the same privileges, protections and rights as opposite-sex marriages, under federal law.† -Attorney GeneralRead More Relationships and Marriage - Dont Marry!1494 Words   |  6 PagesDont Marry! Marriage is quite likely the one most damaging force our species have ever invented, up to and including war. Harold Christensen, author of Marriage Analysis, is not the only person who believes marriage is in many ways hogwash. To borrow a phrase from the 1980s, young women simply have to say no to marriage. Not only is it unnecessary, but a bad habit as well. We young women who are now at the age for which marriage becomes a regular topic of conversation need

Friday, May 8, 2020

How Will The Frontier Be Affected By A Positive Change

Question One a. Why is the PPF concave to the origin? The production possibilities frontier is concave to the origin as it represents the increase opportunity goods along with the outputs of goods which is increasing. This is due to the law of opportunity goods – with one increase or production, an increase in opportunity costs follows (Layton, Robinson and Tucker, 2016). b. How will the frontier be affected by a positive change in technology for the product on the horizontal axis? The points represented on the production possibilities frontier represent the maxim outputs of each product (Layton, Robinson and Tucker, 2016. The amount of tables produced each year is presented on the vertical axis’s and the amount of chairs produced each†¦show more content†¦Elasticity is not confined to demand curves as the demand of a product consumed is not always related to the price of the item. For instance the demand of meat products may be high during holiday seasons, while the price is the same throughout the year and vice versa. b. The demand for a product is price elastic and the product s price is decreased by X%. What might be the expected change in quantity demanded and revenue? If a product is price elastic and the price decrease this will result in more people purchasing the product and therefor the revenue will increase. This is because more people are going to purchase the product in higher quantities if they see it at a cheaper price. For instance supermarkets often promote price dropped items, at a new cheaper price, this means more people are likely to buy that brand of product as opposed another that is a higher price – resulting in a higher revenue for the product (Layton, Robinson and Tucker, 2016). Question Four a. Explain why profits are maximised when MR = MC. Profits are maximised when market revenue = market cost because the amount of product being produced is equal to the cost of producing the output. If marginal revenue was left then marginal cost, this would be the cost of producing the output was less than the revenue, causing the profit to lower (Layton, Robinson and Tucker,Show MoreRelatedTrade Liberalization Can Boost Productivity By Inducing A Better Allocation Of Production Factors1436 Words   |  6 Pagesfaster technical change not only innovation but also adoption of new technologies. Bloom et al. (2011) discover that the absolute volume of innovation (not just per worker productivity or patents) increases within firms and industries more affected by exogenous reductions in barriers to the country’s imports. The following three problems were discussed by Bloom et al. (2011). (i) The data from the last decade used to examine the recent role of trade in affecting technical change in developed countriesRead MoreQuestions On Problems And Applications1473 Words   |  6 Pagesexpenses for the family. b. a member of Congress deciding how much to spend on national parks etc. Congress can make a trade-off on spending money for national parks or can use the money for other expenses like educations, national defense, medical etc. c. a company president deciding whether to open a new factory Opening a new factory can reduce other activities to expend the factory. d. a professor deciding how much to prepare for class A professor would make a trade offRead MoreEconomy1064 Words   |  5 Pagesimports of low-wage Asian clothing.† Answer the following: a. Which parts of this quote are positive statements? Which parts are normative statements? The parts of the quote that are positive statements: Workers in Asia often work in sweatshop conditions earning only pennies and hour; and American workers are more productive and as a result earn a higher wages. These positive statements try to describe how things are currently happening. Normative statements: In order to preserve the dignityRead MoreAmerican Imperialism Then and Now: Diffusion of the American Culture1337 Words   |  6 PagesEnglish predecessors. Thus America’s New Frontier was born. America built up its imperialistic nature throughout the 19th century and on into the 20th century, flexing its muscles and establishing itself as a new world superpower. The modern United States no longer finds land to claim, but instead is involved with a Cultural Imperialism, which has affected how other countries around the world feel about the United States. Americas need to find a new frontier has long been a part of the American identityRead MoreClimate Change And Global Warming1022 Words   |  5 PagesWhat = Climate Change Who = Emma, Aoife, Julia, Rachael, Mariah and Cà ©line What is it? Climate Change is a change in the demographic distribution of weather patterns, and related change in oceans, land surfaces and ice sheets, happening over time scales of decades or longer. It’s the world’s greatest threat. Climate change is the change in temperature over a period of time. It involves the greenhouse effect and global warming. Where is it? It is an issue affecting everyone everywhere. ClimateRead MoreThe Slavery Of The Moors1241 Words   |  5 Pagesgot to be persecuted is on account of they are self-mistreating. At the point when the frontier strengths from Europe withdrew intertribal fighting broke out, and it proceeds right up til the present time. On that line of thought, the slave brokers purchased slaves from blacks who had oppressed them. Bondage and mistreatment were found out by Europeans from the Moors and the Africans themselves. One story of how a preacher obtained his, the first slave, shows the point. The Missionary purchased aRead MorePrinciple Of People Face Trade Offs1199 Words   |  5 Pagesbest thing to reach their goals Marginal Changes are incremental changes to an existing plan Marginal Benefit exceeds cost-then rational decision makers continue course of action Example- Farmer should only produce another bushel of corn if price for it exceeds his cost of making it Principle 4- People Respond to Incentives Incentive-something that induces people to act Rational people respond when marginal benefit or costs change Public policies change benefits and cost and can come with unwantedRead MoreThe Frontier : A Massive Influence2110 Words   |  9 PagesThe Frontier – A Massive Influence At present, we consider ourselves living in a modern society with big cities and advanced technologies. New innovations allow us to transport and connect around the globe quickly. Human have more opportunities to interact, communicate and develop. The American life we live is such a happy picture drawn by ourselves, by the American Dream. But as a natural reaction, with those delightful and colorful layers on the top, we tend to forget the backdrop of our pictureRead MoreThe Evaluation Of Boeing Management Planning Essay example1383 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction The Boeing Cooperation has many legal, ethic, and social responsibilities that impact their organization. This paper will discuss a few of their responsibilities and how they impact the Boeing Corporation management planning. There are also many factors that impact the Boeing companies strategic, tactical, operational, and contingency planning. Three of these factors will be analyzed and then discussed with in. With â€Å"Boeing being the world largest aerospace company and the largest manufactureRead MoreAlpha Pi Alph The Power Of Positivity And Its Influence It Has On The Mindset Of Students1695 Words   |  7 PagesOur chapter, Alpha Pi Omega , focused on the power of positivity and its influence it has on the mindset of students who attend community college for our Honors in Action project this year. Ideas and Ideologies as Frontiers was chosen as the theme for this year’s Honors in Action project. With the incredible leadership and dedication from our chapter’s m embers we were able to all take part in researching, analysing and discussing possible themes and angles that could be further explored. Every week

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Tesco Descriptionin Strategy Free Essays

Tesco is one of the organizations who have good corporate level strategy to analyze and deal with potential risk. In the case study of Tesco, they tend to expand their Asian market through alliances with the local retailers. The managements believe that this strategy can lead a good development in current resources and competence. We will write a custom essay sample on Tesco Descriptionin Strategy or any similar topic only for you Order Now The type of goods, services and environment demanded by consumers indicate the culture of the country and it can predict their consequent attitudes and beliefs. By entering into joint ventures, Tesco can know more about the local knowledge from their partners and improve their supply chain, product development and stores operations skills to deliver a better shopping experiences and environment to customers. Social culture play an important role in business growth rate, the managements of Tesco realize it and develop strategy to cope with it. Tesco also mentioned that the success of partnerships can depend on three main factors, which are sustainability, acceptability and feasibility. Sustainability can refer as whether the strategy addresses the situation under the operating of company. The acceptability is related to the expected outcomes, level of risk and the reaction of stakeholder. Feasibility is focus on the abilities and resources that are needed when carry out the strategy. Another corporate strategy that implemented by Tesco is diversification. According to Johnson and Scholes (2003), they believe that when the business environment change, it is necessary for an organization to create new products and services in order to consolidate their market (as cited in Ivory Research, 2009). The top managements of Tesco have to take this strategy seriously, because changing not only can strengthen their competence but also can make thing worst. Diversification need to implement in the right way and right time. For the case of Tesco, they are trying to design different store formats from other hypermarket. This will be the uniqueness of Tesco in that country because it will fulfill the needs of customer that cannot get from other hypermarket. Besides that, the management of technological innovation is highly involved in strategic decision making. Tesco have to minimize their internal weaknesses and strengthen internal superiority. How to cite Tesco Descriptionin Strategy, Papers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Starbucks Case Study Essay Example

Starbucks Case Study Essay Conner A Intro to Business 3/26/2013 Case Study Consumer Behavior in the Coffee Industry Did you know one franchise alone dominated an entire payment-processing market in just one year? You might have heard of this giant company by the name Starbucks. Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, had a significant role in the company’s growth. Starbucks has steadily dominated the coffee market and has even extended to being a 3rd home for many of its consumers. Based in Seattle, Starbucks had significant competition when it opened its first store in the Pike Place market in Seattle, yet still managed to become superior. Starbucks used new advertising tactics and presented a unique experience for its customers, all of which was a game changer in the business world. Starbucks was created when three friends opened a small store to sell coffee beans and roast in 1971[1]. Jerry Baldwin, Gordon Bowler and Zev Siegl opened their store in the heart of the unique open air market in downtown Seattle. Located just off the harbor, Pike place market was the optimal location and attracted many residents and tourists. After ten years of incredible growth, Jerry Baldwin hired Howard Schultz as head of management. When Schultz first started, he slowly learned the coffee industry and helped made subtle but significant changes. For example, Schultz noticed that â€Å"first-time customers sometimes felt uneasy in the stores†[2] so he developed â€Å"customer-friendly sales skills and produced brochures that made it easy for customers to learn about fine coffees†2 Schultz had the vision of making Starbucks a coffee lounge versus a bar after being inspired by eastern traditions. We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Even though he did not agree with the new direction, Baldwin allowed Schultz to open one espresso bar and in 2 years, Schultz was able to buy out Baldwin and equity owners with the help of investors in 19921. Howard Schultz initially saw the power of consumer behavior early on when he realized Starbucks began to be a social gathering mecca for people instead of just an espresso stand. When Schultz first noticed the ‘seismic change in consumer behavior,’ he adopted a free-Wi-Fi service and mobile payment service and noticed that Starbucks began to attract people as if it was a third home for coffee enthusiasts. Although he jokes about not getting rent from consumers, it allowed Starbucks to create an online-experience in their ‘3rd home’ which was unique to the coffee scene in the United States. With scheduled deliveries and privatized ad networking, Starbucks was maximizing its profits and allowing an experience for coffee enthusiasts that did not make them feel locked-into paying. This shift in consumer behavior was in response to the cultural need for a place between home and work. As social beings, humans thrive for an excuse to hang out and socialize or participate in a community environment. This amazing experience that Starbucks supplied needed to be fine-tuned like any business plan. Like any business, Starbucks had challenges, such as their management of spending. In an interview entitled Business Brilliant, Schultz said that too much was focused on the customer instead of the infrastructure. To improve this, Schultz developed a unique experience in the store with the paired pastry-drinks and released free Wi-Fi for customers. In addition to free-Wi-Fi, mobile payments allowed consumers to avoid lines and continue their private work in the confines of the lounge. Soon Starbucks was thriving and announced that â€Å"the opening of 150 new stores in five years significantly exceeded the 1987 business plan’s objective of 125†[3]. Like every company, Starbucks faced unique issues in their business which slowed down growth initially which in effect slowed down growth in the long run. Schultz attributed the biggest hold-back in the long run to not investing in the supply chain, technology or manufacturing. Although Starbucks was marketing their franchise extremely well, they did not invest ahead of the growth curve and the infrastructures became under-par. In the Business Brilliant, Schultz candidly admitted that Starbucks â€Å"solely accelerated growth of the company. † Moreover, Schultz said the issue was that Starbucks â€Å"needed competency well beyond the size of the company and needed the kind of capability they didn’t have. † Since their infrastructure’s efficiency in the short run was hindered by technological limitations coupled with access to capital, the entire store chains needed to be shut down. Schultz defined the event as a need to redesign their image and retrain their employees. Starbucks was losing grip on the customers and their loyalty because the experience of Starbucks was losing its unique features. All of these internal and external issues that Starbucks was facing were all connected with values and company image according to Schultz. Schultz was so specific with the Starbucks experience that when he smelt burning cheese in a store he decided to ask the workers and they told him â€Å"So what, profits are up! † Soon after this, Schultz decided to close down and retrain all stores and employees. He sent out a press release admitting that Starbucks was misrepresenting itself. Although no one had accused or criticized Starbuck’s prior to his declaration, it was a bold move which negatively impacted the financial strength of the Company. However, the action proved loyal to the consumer and enhanced brand loyalty for Starbuck-addicts. This root issue of misrepresentation in the Starbuck’s experience and the company vision was so significant to Schultz that he needed rework his company from the ground up. This road block of ‘conserving the core businesses’ and ‘pushing for relevant innovation’ made Schultz tweak and adjust the Starbucks experience constantly but effectively. While Schultz attributes the root issue for Starbucks to be company image and adapting core values, could it be possible that the vision and image were not correctly portrayed because of unwise funding? Schultz does admit the funding issues contributed to the core issue of misrepresentation of company image and values, but he does not see the two issues in separate environments. Schultz assigns the core issue to misrepresentation and the surface symptoms to be funding. However, more funding or a different funding plan with more focus in infrastructure would have changed the outcome. The core issue was funding and the symptoms of the core issues were misrepresentation because of resource allocation. While their short term fixed costs of infrastructure and labor were solved, their reserved and recurring allocation towards the upgrades of their infrastructure lacked significantly. If properly funded before and seen ahead of the curve, their growth could have been anticipated. This is evident through the need to shut down and retrain employees. It’s clear that the total fixed and variable costs exceeded their revenue initially. Like all companies, there was a start-up curve but when the curve was dealt with, resource allocation was not the focus. The best plan of action ideally would start with addressing resource allocation. Starbucks was able to stay in business and have great growth so it’s clear the management was able to properly allocate their average variable costs and fixed costs for the most part. Nevertheless, it would have been best if the costs were optimized and revenue was set aside for changes in infrastructure. Funding should have been directed at things which would have produced stability in the long run. This would have lowered their total costs and properly funded their infrastructures for the long run and short run. Schultz should have looked at the management immediately after buying out the company and properly hired people with skills that would be able to guide Starbucks through significant growth. Investment in infrastructure to avoid long-term costs would have saved Starbucks from funding issues at later times. In addition to optimizing their infrastructure for the long run, Starbucks needed to invest more in manufacturing and supply chain for the success in the long run. For example, Starbucks should have initially allocated more funding towards small upgrades in their infrastructure such as ovens versus microwaves to avoid unpleasant scents in the customer’s experience. This also connects to Schultz’s emphasis on hiring employees and affiliates based on similar values. If the decision to hire those employees would have initially been more focused on similar values in addition to management skills, the variable costs to upgrade the infrastructure in the long run would have been lower because the management would have been more motivated to deal with the issue before the CEO had to see the symptoms. Finally, the management of Starbucks needed to choose their employee’s more wisely from the start. If Schultz would have chosen his employee’s based on the similarity of their values and the company vision, little issues such as smell in the customer’s experience would have been dealt with more efficiently. This connects to optimizing their infrastructure but focuses on the employees instead of the technology. It’s important to treat both with separate solutions because Schultz reminded us that the employees can only work with the assets they are provided with. This small change in the focus of the start-up of the company could benefit the image of Starbucks very efficiently and in a cost-productive way. Schultz jokes about not getting rent from Starbucks admirers yet he also notes that the potential to plug into the social media of the internet and create the environment was more beneficial than the issue of customers hanging out inside the store. The evolving Starbucks experience caused consumers to have incredible brand loyalty over alternatives such as Pete’s Coffee and Tea and Tullies. Yet the quick and agile response of technology was exactly what Starbucks needed to put it ahead of the ‘growth curve’ in social media while its competitors struggled behind. Schultz’s solutions were effective in the short run but he still realized his long run potential was limited by resource allocation. The problem with Starbucks and consumers was not the shift in demand for coffee consumers but it was resource allocation and initial planning. Howard Schultz’s plan of action was headed in the right direction apart from the minor mix-up between the surface symptoms and the core issue. In addition to new work practices, Schultz integrated new management and had to let go many of the people he knew were limited to the knowledge of the short-term. This new resource allocation towards what Schultz called ‘the backside’ of the company, allowed the company to finally resolve its funding and allocation issues. The new plan of action consisted of hiring new employees and investing in infrastructure to anticipate growth and new forms of technology; the poor management habits of the past from would not hinder Starbucks in the future. Similar to my suggested plan of action, Schultz’s initiative consisted of new employee’s, new technology and investing in the short term. If Schultz’s would have put more funding towards infrastructure to bring stability in the long run, he would have been able to manage the shift in consumer behavior and maintain profit without the need to close down the stores for retraining. The issue for Starbucks is not losing customers but how to accurately represent the company’s values. Moreover, if the employees were chosen correctly and the infrastructure was properly optimized, Schultz plan would have worked perfectly. All in all, every company in any industry is going to face challenges and have limited resources to meet them in an efficient manner. Howard Schultz used the resources he had to best manage Starbucks and handled the big issues he had efficiently and creatively. The future of Starbucks all depends on its management and commitment to adhering to the company vision and values. After experiencing the 2000-2008 period, one can see that the values will inevitably shift with changes in management. 4] The future of Starbucks is highly dependent on how long Howard Schultz continues to be an active part of the company and in shaping its vision. If affiliates and employees are chosen intelligently and have values matched properly with the company’s mission, Starbucks’s vision should be passed down effectively through each generation of new management. Nevertheless, the rise and fall of competitors in a market is inevitable and time will tell if Starbucks will eventually be surpass ed by a competitor. Starbucks will be a primary educational focus for many business programs. It is one of the best managed franchises in history and will remain one of the most successful for a long period of time. Like any business, Schultz received criticism for extreme responses yet these responses excelled the growth of the company. Much like my suggestions, Schultz acted quickly and made extreme changes which were crucial to repairing the infrastructure. Unlike most companies, Starbucks’s major focus is promoting the company image and values instead of putting profits first. Works Cited I. Schiff, Lewis. Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz Coming to NYC. Inc. com. INC, 18 Mar. 2011. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. II. Starbucks Corporation History. History of Starbucks Corporation – FundingUniverse. Funding Universe, n. d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. III. McGraw Hill. Starbucks Corporation. Starbucks Case Study. MHHE. com, n. d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. [1] Funding Universe, Starbucks Corporate History [2] McGraw Hill, Starbucks Case Study, Starbucks Corporate History [3] McGraw Hill, St arbucks Case Study, Starbucks Corporate History [4] Funding Universe, Starbucks Corporation History Starbucks Case Study Essay Example Starbucks Case Study Essay Conner A Intro to Business 3/26/2013 Case Study Consumer Behavior in the Coffee Industry Did you know one franchise alone dominated an entire payment-processing market in just one year? You might have heard of this giant company by the name Starbucks. Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, had a significant role in the company’s growth. Starbucks has steadily dominated the coffee market and has even extended to being a 3rd home for many of its consumers. Based in Seattle, Starbucks had significant competition when it opened its first store in the Pike Place market in Seattle, yet still managed to become superior. Starbucks used new advertising tactics and presented a unique experience for its customers, all of which was a game changer in the business world. Starbucks was created when three friends opened a small store to sell coffee beans and roast in 1971[1]. Jerry Baldwin, Gordon Bowler and Zev Siegl opened their store in the heart of the unique open air market in downtown Seattle. Located just off the harbor, Pike place market was the optimal location and attracted many residents and tourists. After ten years of incredible growth, Jerry Baldwin hired Howard Schultz as head of management. When Schultz first started, he slowly learned the coffee industry and helped made subtle but significant changes. For example, Schultz noticed that â€Å"first-time customers sometimes felt uneasy in the stores†[2] so he developed â€Å"customer-friendly sales skills and produced brochures that made it easy for customers to learn about fine coffees†2 Schultz had the vision of making Starbucks a coffee lounge versus a bar after being inspired by eastern traditions. We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Starbucks Case Study specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Even though he did not agree with the new direction, Baldwin allowed Schultz to open one espresso bar and in 2 years, Schultz was able to buy out Baldwin and equity owners with the help of investors in 19921. Howard Schultz initially saw the power of consumer behavior early on when he realized Starbucks began to be a social gathering mecca for people instead of just an espresso stand. When Schultz first noticed the ‘seismic change in consumer behavior,’ he adopted a free-Wi-Fi service and mobile payment service and noticed that Starbucks began to attract people as if it was a third home for coffee enthusiasts. Although he jokes about not getting rent from consumers, it allowed Starbucks to create an online-experience in their ‘3rd home’ which was unique to the coffee scene in the United States. With scheduled deliveries and privatized ad networking, Starbucks was maximizing its profits and allowing an experience for coffee enthusiasts that did not make them feel locked-into paying. This shift in consumer behavior was in response to the cultural need for a place between home and work. As social beings, humans thrive for an excuse to hang out and socialize or participate in a community environment. This amazing experience that Starbucks supplied needed to be fine-tuned like any business plan. Like any business, Starbucks had challenges, such as their management of spending. In an interview entitled Business Brilliant, Schultz said that too much was focused on the customer instead of the infrastructure. To improve this, Schultz developed a unique experience in the store with the paired pastry-drinks and released free Wi-Fi for customers. In addition to free-Wi-Fi, mobile payments allowed consumers to avoid lines and continue their private work in the confines of the lounge. Soon Starbucks was thriving and announced that â€Å"the opening of 150 new stores in five years significantly exceeded the 1987 business plan’s objective of 125†[3]. Like every company, Starbucks faced unique issues in their business which slowed down growth initially which in effect slowed down growth in the long run. Schultz attributed the biggest hold-back in the long run to not investing in the supply chain, technology or manufacturing. Although Starbucks was marketing their franchise extremely well, they did not invest ahead of the growth curve and the infrastructures became under-par. In the Business Brilliant, Schultz candidly admitted that Starbucks â€Å"solely accelerated growth of the company. † Moreover, Schultz said the issue was that Starbucks â€Å"needed competency well beyond the size of the company and needed the kind of capability they didn’t have. † Since their infrastructure’s efficiency in the short run was hindered by technological limitations coupled with access to capital, the entire store chains needed to be shut down. Schultz defined the event as a need to redesign their image and retrain their employees. Starbucks was losing grip on the customers and their loyalty because the experience of Starbucks was losing its unique features. All of these internal and external issues that Starbucks was facing were all connected with values and company image according to Schultz. Schultz was so specific with the Starbucks experience that when he smelt burning cheese in a store he decided to ask the workers and they told him â€Å"So what, profits are up! † Soon after this, Schultz decided to close down and retrain all stores and employees. He sent out a press release admitting that Starbucks was misrepresenting itself. Although no one had accused or criticized Starbuck’s prior to his declaration, it was a bold move which negatively impacted the financial strength of the Company. However, the action proved loyal to the consumer and enhanced brand loyalty for Starbuck-addicts. This root issue of misrepresentation in the Starbuck’s experience and the company vision was so significant to Schultz that he needed rework his company from the ground up. This road block of ‘conserving the core businesses’ and ‘pushing for relevant innovation’ made Schultz tweak and adjust the Starbucks experience constantly but effectively. While Schultz attributes the root issue for Starbucks to be company image and adapting core values, could it be possible that the vision and image were not correctly portrayed because of unwise funding? Schultz does admit the funding issues contributed to the core issue of misrepresentation of company image and values, but he does not see the two issues in separate environments. Schultz assigns the core issue to misrepresentation and the surface symptoms to be funding. However, more funding or a different funding plan with more focus in infrastructure would have changed the outcome. The core issue was funding and the symptoms of the core issues were misrepresentation because of resource allocation. While their short term fixed costs of infrastructure and labor were solved, their reserved and recurring allocation towards the upgrades of their infrastructure lacked significantly. If properly funded before and seen ahead of the curve, their growth could have been anticipated. This is evident through the need to shut down and retrain employees. It’s clear that the total fixed and variable costs exceeded their revenue initially. Like all companies, there was a start-up curve but when the curve was dealt with, resource allocation was not the focus. The best plan of action ideally would start with addressing resource allocation. Starbucks was able to stay in business and have great growth so it’s clear the management was able to properly allocate their average variable costs and fixed costs for the most part. Nevertheless, it would have been best if the costs were optimized and revenue was set aside for changes in infrastructure. Funding should have been directed at things which would have produced stability in the long run. This would have lowered their total costs and properly funded their infrastructures for the long run and short run. Schultz should have looked at the management immediately after buying out the company and properly hired people with skills that would be able to guide Starbucks through significant growth. Investment in infrastructure to avoid long-term costs would have saved Starbucks from funding issues at later times. In addition to optimizing their infrastructure for the long run, Starbucks needed to invest more in manufacturing and supply chain for the success in the long run. For example, Starbucks should have initially allocated more funding towards small upgrades in their infrastructure such as ovens versus microwaves to avoid unpleasant scents in the customer’s experience. This also connects to Schultz’s emphasis on hiring employees and affiliates based on similar values. If the decision to hire those employees would have initially been more focused on similar values in addition to management skills, the variable costs to upgrade the infrastructure in the long run would have been lower because the management would have been more motivated to deal with the issue before the CEO had to see the symptoms. Finally, the management of Starbucks needed to choose their employee’s more wisely from the start. If Schultz would have chosen his employee’s based on the similarity of their values and the company vision, little issues such as smell in the customer’s experience would have been dealt with more efficiently. This connects to optimizing their infrastructure but focuses on the employees instead of the technology. It’s important to treat both with separate solutions because Schultz reminded us that the employees can only work with the assets they are provided with. This small change in the focus of the start-up of the company could benefit the image of Starbucks very efficiently and in a cost-productive way. Schultz jokes about not getting rent from Starbucks admirers yet he also notes that the potential to plug into the social media of the internet and create the environment was more beneficial than the issue of customers hanging out inside the store. The evolving Starbucks experience caused consumers to have incredible brand loyalty over alternatives such as Pete’s Coffee and Tea and Tullies. Yet the quick and agile response of technology was exactly what Starbucks needed to put it ahead of the ‘growth curve’ in social media while its competitors struggled behind. Schultz’s solutions were effective in the short run but he still realized his long run potential was limited by resource allocation. The problem with Starbucks and consumers was not the shift in demand for coffee consumers but it was resource allocation and initial planning. Howard Schultz’s plan of action was headed in the right direction apart from the minor mix-up between the surface symptoms and the core issue. In addition to new work practices, Schultz integrated new management and had to let go many of the people he knew were limited to the knowledge of the short-term. This new resource allocation towards what Schultz called ‘the backside’ of the company, allowed the company to finally resolve its funding and allocation issues. The new plan of action consisted of hiring new employees and investing in infrastructure to anticipate growth and new forms of technology; the poor management habits of the past from would not hinder Starbucks in the future. Similar to my suggested plan of action, Schultz’s initiative consisted of new employee’s, new technology and investing in the short term. If Schultz’s would have put more funding towards infrastructure to bring stability in the long run, he would have been able to manage the shift in consumer behavior and maintain profit without the need to close down the stores for retraining. The issue for Starbucks is not losing customers but how to accurately represent the company’s values. Moreover, if the employees were chosen correctly and the infrastructure was properly optimized, Schultz plan would have worked perfectly. All in all, every company in any industry is going to face challenges and have limited resources to meet them in an efficient manner. Howard Schultz used the resources he had to best manage Starbucks and handled the big issues he had efficiently and creatively. The future of Starbucks all depends on its management and commitment to adhering to the company vision and values. After experiencing the 2000-2008 period, one can see that the values will inevitably shift with changes in management. 4] The future of Starbucks is highly dependent on how long Howard Schultz continues to be an active part of the company and in shaping its vision. If affiliates and employees are chosen intelligently and have values matched properly with the company’s mission, Starbucks’s vision should be passed down effectively through each generation of new management. Nevertheless, the rise and fall of competitors in a market is inevitable and time will tell if Starbucks will eventually be surpass ed by a competitor. Starbucks will be a primary educational focus for many business programs. It is one of the best managed franchises in history and will remain one of the most successful for a long period of time. Like any business, Schultz received criticism for extreme responses yet these responses excelled the growth of the company. Much like my suggestions, Schultz acted quickly and made extreme changes which were crucial to repairing the infrastructure. Unlike most companies, Starbucks’s major focus is promoting the company image and values instead of putting profits first. Works Cited I. Schiff, Lewis. Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz Coming to NYC. Inc. com. INC, 18 Mar. 2011. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. II. Starbucks Corporation History. History of Starbucks Corporation – FundingUniverse. Funding Universe, n. d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. III. McGraw Hill. Starbucks Corporation. Starbucks Case Study. MHHE. com, n. d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. [1] Funding Universe, Starbucks Corporate History [2] McGraw Hill, Starbucks Case Study, Starbucks Corporate History [3] McGraw Hill, St arbucks Case Study, Starbucks Corporate History [4] Funding Universe, Starbucks Corporation History

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Evaluating the Internet Essays

Evaluating the Internet Essays Evaluating the Internet Essay Evaluating the Internet Essay Internet is one of the most influential tools in the world today. This technology advancement has caused changes on how people study, communicate, and shop. With its capacity to spread information at a faster phase, the Internet provides various links to different websites to locate more easily research materials and resources (Johnson). The Internet also links people who are separated by distance via communication advancement (Comer 4). On-line shopping also benefits professionals who cannot find time to go to the mall (Comer 198). Thus, there is no doubt that the Internet can be evaluated by discussing its impact on communication, education and shopping. Douglas Johnson’s online article mentions how technology is really effective in processing and producing necessary information (Johnson). As a result, education is made easier by the Internet via online university programs. Nowadays, students are more exposed to â€Å"word processors, databases, spreadsheets, presentation programs, multimedia authoring tools, e-mail, video production equipment, digital reference materials, electronic indexes, and network search engines† (Johnson). The Internet is indeed helpful in getting students to do their homework easily (Johnson). Moreover, productivity is increased because more time is saved in doing online researches compared to library researches (Johnson). Aside form the benefits of the Internet to students and education, communication is also enhanced by the Internet by changing the stereotypical way of people’s connection. The Internet makes communication more convenient, reliable, and faster (Comer 167). Paper mails are changed into e-mails or electronic mails, while long distance calls are changed into instant messaging and on-line voice calls (Comer 158). Since easy access is achieved by people in communicating with their loved ones abroad, they feel more connected and will be less mindful of the distance between them. Consequently, the Internet has brought people closer, supporting families, organizations, and communities in the process. Work can also be done at home using the Internet and company websites (Comer 198). It also allows people to meet and greet new people on-line using forums and websites like MySpace and many more (Comer 207). Web camera connection is also one good feature of the Internet since it provides a seemingly face to face interaction between two people who are far from each other. Hence, the Internet does not only pave the way for communication development but for socialization as well. Many shoppers now do their shopping on line because they find it hard going to malls and buy things for themselves. Working professionals can shop for things online, pay using credit cards, and just wait until it is shipped to their houses. The Internet also allows people to access online auctions like eBay where almost every needs and wants are posted and put on sale (Comer 243). The Internet has also led to new sources of revenue. Advertisements are posted in the Internet for a fee since more and more people are using this technology everyday (Comer 255). Meanwhile, networking makes it possible for people to earn even at home by just clicking their mouse and interacting with others (Comer 260). Internet is revolutionizing people’s lives by making enormous changes in governments, businesses, schools, and homes worldwide (Comer 4). Internet technology has worked so well in resulting in sudden success in the fields of communication, education, and business. It is an invention that has capabilities beyond human capacity. It stores more than what humans can memorize, it sends out messages faster than what is expected, and it gives more profit for businesses by reaching out international clients. The Internet has grown so much, and its growth has really involved and impacted much of the world. Comer, Douglas E. The Internet Book. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000. Johnson, Doug. â€Å"Evaluating the Impact of Technology: The Less Simple Answer.† From Now on: The Educational Technology Journal 5 (January/February 1996). 23 June 2008 http://fno.org/jan96/reply.html

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Julia Donaldsons The Gruffalo Picture Book Review

Julia Donaldson's 'The Gruffalo' Picture Book Review Its not surprising that The Gruffalo, first published in 1999, continues to be a popular read aloud. The author, Julia Donaldson, has written a good story with such strong rhythm and rhyme that it just begs to be read aloud. The illustrations by Axel Scheffler are filled with bold color, detail and appealing characters. Summary The Gruffalo is the story of a clever mouse, three large animals that want to eat him and an imaginary monster, a Gruffalo, who turns out to be only too real. Whats a mouse to do when on a walk in the deep dark wood, he is confronted first by a fox, then by an owl and, finally, by a snake, all of whom seem to be intent on inviting him for a meal, with the mouse as the main dish? The mouse tells each of them that he is on his way to a feast with a Gruffalo. The mouses description of the fierce Gruffalo  who would want to eat them scares the fox, the owl, and the snake away. Each time he scares one of the animals away, the mouse says, Doesnt he know? Theres no such thing as a Gruffalo! Imagine the mouses surprise when the monster of his imagination appears right before him in the woods and says, Youll taste good on a slice of bread! The clever mouse comes up with a strategy to convince the Gruffalo that he (the mouse) is the scariest creature in this deep dark wood. How the mouse fools the Gruffalo after fooling the fox, the owl and the snake makes a very satisfying story. A Good Book to Read Aloud Besides the rhythm and the rhyme, some of the other things that make The Gruffalo a good book for reading aloud to young children are the repetitions which encourage children to chime in. Also, the story arc, with the first half of the story about the mouse fooling the fox, then the owl, then the snake with tales of the imaginary Gruffalo and the second half of the story when the mouse misleads the real Gruffalo with the unsuspecting help of the snake, the owl, and the fox. Kids also like the fact that the 1-2-3 order of the mouses meeting the fox, the owl, and the snake becomes a 3-2-1 order as the mouse walks back to the edge of the woods, followed by the Gruffalo. The Author Julia Donaldson grew up in London and attended Bristol University where she studied Drama and French. Before writing childrens books, she was a teacher, a songwriter,  and a street theater performer. In June 2011, Julia Donaldson  was named the 2011-2013 Waterstones Childrens Laureate in the UK. According to the 6/7/11 announcement, The role of the Childrens Laureate is awarded once every two years to an eminent writer or illustrator of childrens books to celebrate outstanding achievement in their field. Donaldson has written more than 120 books and plays for kids and teens. The Gruffalo, one of Julia Donaldsons first childrens books, is also one of her most popular childrens picture books. Others include  Room on the Broom, Stick Man, The Snail and the Whale and What the Ladybird Heard. The Illustrator Axel Scheffler was born in Germany and attended the University of Hamburg but left there to move to England where he studied illustration and earned a degree at the Bath Academy of Art. Axel Scheffler has illustrated some Julia Donaldsons books in addition to The Gruffalo. They include  Room on the Broom, The Snail and the Whale, Stick Man and Zog. Book and Animation Awards Among the awards the creators of The Gruffalo picture book have been honored with are the 1999 Smarties Gold Medal Award for picture books and the 2000 Blue Peter Award for The Best Book to Read Aloud. The animated version of The Gruffalo, which is available on DVD, was nominated for both an Oscar and a British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) award  and won the audience award at the Canadian Film Centres Worldwide Short Film Festival. Delight Your Child With a Story Sack If your child loves The Gruffalo, youll want to create a story sack for of crafts and related items. These can include other books by Julia Donaldson about the Gruffalo; mouse, owl, snake and fox crafts; a monster craft and more. Review and Recommendation The story of the clever mouse and the Gruffalo is one that children ages 3 to 6 love hearing again and again. The rhythm and rhyme of Julia Donaldsons story, along with the strong story arc, make The Gruffalo an excellent read aloud. Children quickly learn to help the reader tell the story, and that adds to the fun for all. The dramatic illustrations by Axel Scheffler, with their bold colors and appealing characters, from the little mouse to the colossal Gruffalo, add significantly to the books appeal. (Dial Books for Young Readers, A Division of Penguin Putnam Inc., 1999. ISBN: 9780803731097) Sources: Childrens Laureate siteJulia Donaldson siteChildrens Book Illustration: Axel Scheffler, The Hollywood Reporter

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Managing Human Capital Assignment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words

Managing Human Capital Assignment - Essay Example People are complex, and the elements that motivate the human will involve more than the material or financial. Figure 1 is an author’s conception of the gamut spanned by the human resource reward system in an organization. Rewards may be intrinsic or extrinsic; intrinsic rewards are those values that an employee perceives he attains when he performs a certain job well. The value pursued by the employee is intangible, and the flawless execution of the job is itself its own reward, from which the employee derives immeasurable personal satisfaction. Factors that may enhance intrinsic rewards to the employee include the ability to participate in decision-making, relative freedom and discretion on the job, the assignment of work the employee finds more interesting, and the opportunity for personal growth, among others. There are likewise rewards that are of an extrinsic nature, that is, the source of the personal satisfaction derived by the employee is not part and parcel of the job itself, but is a result of the workings of the company’s incentive policies and system. Extrinsic rewards may be classified as either financial or non-financial. Financial rewards may be performance based (e.g. piecework, incentive pay plans, performance bonuses and merit pay plans), implied membership based (e.g.. profit sharing, cost of living increases, time-in-rank increase), and explicit membership based (e.g. protection programs, pay for time not worked, and services and perquisites). Those non-financial rewards include preferred office furnishing, assigned parking spaces, and ability to determine one’s preferred work assignments. Reference to different types of rewards or combinations thereof shall be made in the discussion. Merit issues span a broad and differentiated set of considerations, but which principally involve the determination of those aspects of